Quick Question – Unique Family Situation

Home Forums Purchase Program Quick Question – Unique Family Situation

Tagged: 

Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #70676
    mdub88
    Member

    So in January 2019, I separated from my husband and went to live with my mom. I was the breadwinner in the household and the lease was in my name. I agreed to continue to keep paying rent so that I can keep the tax benefits associated. My kids stayed with father and in turn he paid what he thought was due for the living situation. My mom started charging me $500 for rent in May 2019. So basically I have 2 rents but I alway incurred late fees because I paid late on rent where my husband was staying.

    Now my husband lost his job due to COVID and his monthly payments stopped. Is it possible to get a loan through Naca using my payment to my mom? I obviously can afford $2500+ in rent… I’m just trying to get a home in the area where my kids attend school

    I have

    #70682
    Nelsont
    Member

    If your name is on any contract whether it be a cosigner where you are not making any payments, co-lessee where you only pay a portion, or sole applicant you are legally obligated for the full amount. Because of that naca will consider the full amount as part of your DTI.

    If your husband was paying any portion of the rent that had your name on the lease you might be able to get around the late fees with a letter of explanation and some cooperation from your husband.

    The first thing you need to do is take your name off the lease or re-prioritize your finances to prevent any late fees in the future.

    As for your mom she will need to provide a letter explaining the situation. She needs to charge you in a traceable form of payment so if it’s cash that needs to stop.

    Your husband’s employment should not matter unless that means your finances are negatively impacted by non-payment or increased support for 2 households.

    Which kind of brings me to the last point. Look at state regulations for buying houses while married. Some states are considered “Common Property” states and will require your husband to be on the deed regardless of whether he is on the loan and he would be entitled to half the property…unless divorce papers are signed prior to submitting an offer on a house. Just some things to think about.

Viewing 2 posts - 1 through 2 (of 2 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
Follow us on Facebook RSS Feed Follow us on Twitter