Child Support as Income?

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  • #64956

    So I have three kids and although my ex-husband was ordered to pay child support he has never paid a single dime. I recently got word from a mutual friend that he is working a legitimate job. Assuming that he actually keeps this job, his wages are going to get garnished for child support as well as the arrears that he owes me.

    My question is… at what point would I be able to use the additional $ as income? Do I have to be receiving the payments consistently over a certain time period or would I be able to use it right away? It would be nice if I can raise my approved monthly mortgage payment so that I can have more house options.

    #64957
    2BLESSED
    Member

    Why would you even think of counting monies that you have never seen before and it is not guaranteed to your children? According to your statement, “So I have three kids and although my ex-husband was ordered to pay child support he has never paid a single dime.” I am sure you will not be able to count money from your ex-husband with the NACA program or any other lending institution unless you can prove consistency. Good luck on your journey.

    #64958

    Because I have it on good authority that I may begin seeing money and if so I want to know if its going to help the situation. As is stands currently I’m going to have a really hard time finding a home in the Austin area at an approved amount of $1,290 a month. Counting the child support would potentially increase that monthly mortgage payment to $1400 a month which would make a world of difference in my situation. I realize that I may be counting my chickens before they hatch but I would still like to know if this will actually help or not.

    #64959
    Nelsont
    Member

    I have no knowledge of this however since it is court mandate I wonder if the child support can be counted. I think it can especially since the wages can be garnished and even back paid to get the full unpaid amount.

    Even so I am inclined to think it still won’t matter for these reasons:

    1. there has been no consistent demonstration of income
    2. with no consistent job or work history with w2 your ex-husband hasn’t demonstrated the ability to consistently pay child support
    3. once your child turns 18 your child support income is gone potentially leaving you with a mortgage you cannot afford

    The person best suited to answer this though is your MC.

    Buying a house is tough. You can get qualified in Manhattan on minimum wage. But we all know you aren’t buying a house in Manhattan on minimum wage πŸ™ Just stay positive and keep looking. There is something out there for you.

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 1 week ago by Nelsont.
    • This reply was modified 8 months, 1 week ago by Nelsont.
    #65035
    TTrumble
    Member

    Hello TattedQueen87,

    There are specific guidelines regarding child support. NACA requires that support be court ordered, has been received consistently and on time for at least six months, and will continue for at least five years to be able to be considered income for calculating your affordability.

    Additionally, Federal Law gives you the right to not have child support, alimony, Social Security or other benefits considered if you do not wish to have them included as income for a mortgage or any other form of credit.

    Tim Trumble
    Online Operations, NACA
    ttrumble@naca.com

    #71995
    aprilmichelle224
    Participant

    My child support isn’t court ordered, can I still use it?

    #71997
    Nelsont
    Member

    If it’s not court ordered it won’t count as income. You can still use it to build your mrf just nothing else.

    Income can only be an officially documented source that is federally taxed.

    • This reply was modified 3 days, 20 hours ago by Nelsont.
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